As the population ages, surgical complexity increases due to accumulation of comorbidities2

At least 62% of adults aged 65-74 have multiple comorbidities2

 
 
81.5%
62%

Prevalence of
multiple comorbidities increases to >80% in adults aged ≥852

The population aged 65 and over will more than double by 20603

Many patients have comorbidities or use medications that can compromise their coagulation status

1 in 7

adults have renal failure4

30%

of the US population use low-dose aspirin for CVD prevention5

1 in 50

adults have liver disease6

1 in 3

adults will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime7

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A compromised coagulation status increases the risk of intraoperative bleeding complications8

Watch the intact coagulation process in action
 
But what happens if the patient’s coagulation status is compromised?
 
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Active adjunctive hemostats are more effective than passive hemostats9-11

   
 
   
     
A
Active
     
P
Passive
 

Function independently of the patient’s ability to generate clotting factors to achieve hemostasis

   
     
 

Effective regardless of coagulation status

   
     
 

Effective across a wide range of bleeding

   
     
 
         

Unlike passive hemostats, active hemostats are able to control a wider range of bleeding, from mild to severe9

 
Hemostats achieved
within 10 minutes*
P
Passive
A
Active
 
 

Bleeding Severity

 

Learn more about the first surgeon validated and FDA accepted intraoperative bleeding scale. Click here.

*Based on preclinical data. Results may not correlate to performance in humans.

Active hemostatic products are available as flowables, fibrin sealants or advanced patches

A
Active hemostatic products
  • Flowables(thrombin + gelatin)

  • Fibrin sealant

  • Stand-alone thrombin

  • Advanced patcheswith PEG or fibrin sealants

P
Passive hemostatic products
  • Oxidized Cellulose

  • Collagens

  • Powders

  • Gelatin Sponges

  • Polysaccharide Spheres

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Use of an active hemostat could significantly improve clinical outcomes and help hospitals save money10, 12

Compared with a passive hemostat, use of an active hemostat can result in:

 

6x

faster hemostasisin mild-to-moderate bleeding, regardless of
coagulation status and initial bleeding rate9*

*Preclinical data. Results may not correlate to performance in humans.

 

24 mins

shorter operative time in CV procedures10
 

53%

lower transfusion rate in CV procedures10
 

67%

lower revision rate in CV procedures10
 

38%

reduction in minor complications
in CV procedures10
 

$5.38m

annual net savings with exclusive use of active
hemostats in CV procedures12
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Based on Matthew’s notes, what would be the most appropriate hemostasis strategy?

(Select Active or Passive below)

Name: Matthew B.
Age: 68 years old
Procedure: Coronary Artery Bypass
Notes and Observations:
  • - History of Renal failure
  • - On NOAC therapy for A Fib
  • - Dual Antiplatelet Therapy
  • - Daily fish oil supplement
Hemostatic agent

It’s time to think about your hemostasis strategy

Please share your views with us!*

Do you agree that patient coagulation should influence your hemostat selection?
Would you use an active hemostat as your first line adjunctive hemostat?

*All insights and personal data will be treated in the strictest confidence

It’s time to Think Active

Request a call back

Discuss your active hemostasis strategy with us!

Contact Us

Learn more

Access key articles on bleeding complications and topical hemostats

The Use of Topical Hemostatic Agents in Cardiothoracic Surgery

Evidence-based recommendations for the use of topical hemostatic agents in cardiothoracic surgery.

Prospective, Randomized Clinical Trial of the FloSeal Matrix Sealant in Cardiac Surgery

Prospective randomized clinical study comparing an active hemostate (FLOSEAL) to a passive hemostat (SURGICEL NU-KNIT or GELFOAM) in cardiac and thoracic aortic surgery involving 451 patients.

Inefficiencies in Blood Utilization: Opportunities for Improved Outcomes and Policy Action

Summary of meeting between Baxter and experts on key trends in bleeding management, and the need for education on bleeding management.

Impact of Bleeding-related Complications and/or Blood Product Transfusions on Hospital Costs in Inpatient Surgical Patients

Retrospective analysis of bleeding complications during 1.6 million surgeries across multiple specialties performed in the US

Hospital Economic Impact From Hemostatic Matrix Usage in Cardiac Surgery

Cost consequence framework applied to results from a clinical trial comparing active and passive hemostats in 209 patients undergoing cardiac surgery

Learn more

Access key articles on bleeding complications and topical hemostats

The Use of Topical Hemostatic Agents in Cardiothoracic Surgery

Evidence-based recommendations for the use of topical hemostatic agents in cardiothoracic surgery.

Prospective, Randomized Clinical Trial of the FloSeal Matrix Sealant in Cardiac Surgery

Prospective randomized clinical study comparing an active hemostate (FLOSEAL) to a passive hemostat (SURGICEL NU-KNIT or GELFOAM) in cardiac and thoracic aortic surgery involving 451 patients.

Inefficiencies in Blood Utilization: Opportunities for Improved Outcomes and Policy Action

Summary of meeting between Baxter and experts on key trends in bleeding management, and the need for education on bleeding management.

Impact of Bleeding-related Complications and/or Blood Product Transfusions on Hospital Costs in Inpatient Surgical Patients

Retrospective analysis of bleeding complications during 1.6 million surgeries across multiple specialties performed in the US

Hospital Economic Impact From Hemostatic Matrix Usage in Cardiac Surgery

Cost consequence framework applied to results from a clinical trial comparing active and passive hemostats in 209 patients undergoing cardiac surgery

Please share this resource with your colleagues to spread awareness

Was the content of this website valuable to you?
 
 
 
 

References

1. Stokes ME, et al. BMC Health Services Research 2011;11:135; 2. Salive ME. Epidemiol Rev 2013;35:75–83; 3. Mather M, et al. Aging in the United States. Population Bulletin 70, 2015. Available at: https://www.prb.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/aging-us-population-bulletin-1.pdf (accessed January 2020); 4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic Kidney Disease Surveillance System. Available at: https://nccd.cdc.gov/ckd/default.aspx (Accessed January 2020); 5. Stuntz M, et al. Prev Med Rep. 2017;5:183–186; 6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic Liver Disease and Cirrhosis. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/liver-disease.htm (Accessed January 2020); 7. American Cancer Society. Facts & Figures 2019: US Cancer Death Rate has Dropped 27% in 25 Years, Jan 2019. Available at: https://www.cancer.org/latest-news/facts-and-figures-2019.html (Accessed January 2020); 8. Corral M, et al. Clinicoecon Outcomes Res 2015;7:409–21; 9. Slezak P, et al. J Invest Surg 2020; ePub ahead of print; 10. Nasso G, et al. Ann Thorac Surg 2009;88:1520–6; 11. Bracey A, et al. Ann Thorac Surg 2017;104:353–60; 12. Tackett SM, et al. J Med Econ 2014;17:670–6.

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